James Gindlesperger @ Barnes & Noble in McLean, VA
Jun
24
6:00 pm18:00

James Gindlesperger @ Barnes & Noble in McLean, VA

  • Barnes & Noble

Arlington: A Color Guide to America's Most Famous Cemetery


Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

James Gindlesperger @ Bellwood Antis Historical Society
Jun
26
7:00 pm19:00

James Gindlesperger @ Bellwood Antis Historical Society

  • Bellwood Public Library

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

Hugh Price @ One Hundred Black Men, June Meeting
Jun
27
6:00 pm18:00

Hugh Price @ One Hundred Black Men, June Meeting

  • Touro College

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Scott Gould @ Malaprop's
Jun
29
7:00 pm19:00

Scott Gould @ Malaprop's

  • Malaprop's

The debut collection from award-winning short story writer Scott Gould, Strangers to Temptation, takes us to the white sand banks of the Black River in lowcountry South Carolina during the early 1970s, a place in time where religion and race provide the backdrop for an often uneasy coming-of-age. Linked by a common voice, these thirteen stories introduce us to a cast of uniquely Southern characters: a Vietnam vet father with half a stomach who plays a skinny Jesus in the annual Easter play; a mother/nurse attempting to heal the world, all the while sneaking sips of Smirnoff and Tang; a best friend whose reckless dive off a bridge earns him a fake eyeball and a new girlfriend; and our narrator, a baseball-playing, paper-delivering boy just hoping to navigate the crooked path out of adolescence. With the narrator’s eventual baptism into adulthood beneath the dark surface of the Black River, Strangers to Temptation reminds all of us what it felt like to be young, confused, and ultimately redeemed.

James Gindlesperger @ Gettysburg National Military park Visitor Center
Jul
1
9:00 am09:00

James Gindlesperger @ Gettysburg National Military park Visitor Center

  • Gettysburg National Military Park Visitor center

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

Rose Senehi @ Highland Books
Jul
1
1:00 pm13:00

Rose Senehi @ Highland Books

  • Highland Books

Rose Senehi lives in Chimney Rock, N.C., and Carolina Belle is her eighth novel, and the fifth in her Blue Ridge series of "stand alone" books. Among them, Render Unto the Valley was awarded a 2012 IPPY Gold Medal for FictionSoutheast. Dancing on Rocks was awarded the 2014 Indi-Reader Discovery Award for Popular Fiction. In the Shadows of Chimney Rock was nominated for the 2009 SIBA Book Award. The Wind in the Woods, was nominated for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Her other novels include Pelican Watch, Windfall, and Shadows in the Grass.

James Gindlesperger @ Gettysburg Heritage Center
Jul
1
2:00 pm14:00

James Gindlesperger @ Gettysburg Heritage Center

  • Gettysburg Heritage Center

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

Rheta Grimsley Johnson @ CAC Writers Series
Jul
6
12:00 pm12:00

Rheta Grimsley Johnson @ CAC Writers Series

  • Parkinson Hall (Room 117) on the Mississippi University for Women campus, Columbus, MS

In The Dogs Buried Over the Bridge, nationally syndicated columnist Rheta Grimsley Johnson uses a parade of beloved dogs to take readers on a colorful journey. It’s not really a dog book in the Old Yeller sense; it’s a personal story that uses dogs as metaphors for love, loss, and life. 

Jeremy Jones @ East Asheville Public Library
Jul
6
6:30 pm18:30

Jeremy Jones @ East Asheville Public Library

  • East Asheville Public Library

Bearwallow: A Personal History of a Mountain Homeland

Across the Blue Ridge Mountains stretches a world both charming and complicated.

Jeremy Jones and his wife move into a small house above the creek where his family had settled 200 years prior. He takes a job alongside his former teachers in the local elementary school and sets out on a search to understand how this ancient land has shaped its people—how it shaped him. His search sends him burrowing in the past—hunting buried treasure and POW camps, unearthing Civil War graves and family feuds, exploring gated communities and tourist traps, encountering changed accents and immigrant populations, tracing Wal-Mart's sidewalks and carved-out mountains—and pondering the future. He meshes narrative and myth, geology and genealogy, fiddle tunes and local color about the briskly changing and oft-stigmatized world of his native southern Appalachians.

Somehow, these journeys continually lead him back to the mystical Bearwallow Mountain, a peak suddenly in flux.

Hugh Price @ DLA Piper Law Firm
Jul
12
12:00 pm12:00

Hugh Price @ DLA Piper Law Firm

  • DLA Piper Law Firm

 

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

 

Hugh Price @ Alpha Phi Convention
Jul
13
12:00 pm12:00

Hugh Price @ Alpha Phi Convention

  • Holiday Ballroom at Hilton Inner Harbor Baltimore

Price’s memoir recounts his distinguished achievements as an activist, journalist, and educator, and traces key episodes of American history through the lives of his ancestors, including one who fought under Washington and another who was a fugitive slave and drew support from Frederick Douglass. Price himself started his career in New Haven and served as the first executive director of the city’s Black Coalition. In 1978 he joined the editorial board of The New York Times. Ten years later, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, and from 1994 to 2003 he served as president of the National Urban League, before moving on to Brookings and then to the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton.

Ben Anderson @ Hudson Library
Jul
14
3:30 pm15:30

Ben Anderson @ Hudson Library

  • Hudson Library

In Smokies Chronicle, Anderson offers observations on natural and human history, mountain culture, geography, geology, flora and fauna. The book also deftly blends the personal with the universal in a compelling mix of entries from the backcountry.

Although this book can be used as a helpful trail guide, it also provides a fresh look and an engaging narrative about our most heavily visited national park, through the eyes and ears of a writer who has an extensive history with the park.

James Gindlesperger @ Laurel View Village
Jul
17
2:00 pm14:00

James Gindlesperger @ Laurel View Village

  • Laurel View Village

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

Donald Davis @ Stories for Adults, Monterey Public Library
Jul
18
Jul 19

Donald Davis @ Stories for Adults, Monterey Public Library

  • Stories for Adults

A featured storyteller at festivals around the world, Donald Davis makes his home right here on Ocracoke Island! He was born in a Southern Appalachian mountain world also rich in stories. "I didn't learn stories, I just absorbed them," he says, as he recounts tales (and more tales) learned from a family of traditional storytellers who have lived on the same Western North Carolina land since 1781. Davis grew up hearing gentle fairy tales, simple and silly Jack tales, scary mountain lore, ancient Welsh and Scottish folk tales, and most importantly, nourishing true-to-life stories of his own neighbors and kin. It was Uncle Frank, a man who "talked in stories," who helped Donald capture the real and daily adventures of life. . . and it was Uncle Frank who gave him the creative courage to tell about them.

Ben Anderson @ Macon County Public Library
Jul
19
7:00 pm19:00

Ben Anderson @ Macon County Public Library

  • Macon County Public Library

In Smokies Chronicle, Anderson offers observations on natural and human history, mountain culture, geography, geology, flora and fauna. The book also deftly blends the personal with the universal in a compelling mix of entries from the backcountry.

Although this book can be used as a helpful trail guide, it also provides a fresh look and an engaging narrative about our most heavily visited national park, through the eyes and ears of a writer who has an extensive history with the park.

Jeremy Jones @ Appalachian Writers Workshop in Berea, KY
Jul
24
12:00 pm12:00

Jeremy Jones @ Appalachian Writers Workshop in Berea, KY

  • Appalachian Writers workshop

Bearwallow: A Personal History of a Mountain Homeland

Across the Blue Ridge Mountains stretches a world both charming and complicated.

Jeremy Jones and his wife move into a small house above the creek where his family had settled 200 years prior. He takes a job alongside his former teachers in the local elementary school and sets out on a search to understand how this ancient land has shaped its people—how it shaped him. His search sends him burrowing in the past—hunting buried treasure and POW camps, unearthing Civil War graves and family feuds, exploring gated communities and tourist traps, encountering changed accents and immigrant populations, tracing Wal-Mart's sidewalks and carved-out mountains—and pondering the future. He meshes narrative and myth, geology and genealogy, fiddle tunes and local color about the briskly changing and oft-stigmatized world of his native southern Appalachians.

Somehow, these journeys continually lead him back to the mystical Bearwallow Mountain, a peak suddenly in flux.

Ben Anderson @ Albert Carlton Library
Jul
26
10:00 am10:00

Ben Anderson @ Albert Carlton Library

  • Albert Carlton Library

In Smokies Chronicle, Anderson offers observations on natural and human history, mountain culture, geography, geology, flora and fauna. The book also deftly blends the personal with the universal in a compelling mix of entries from the backcountry.

Although this book can be used as a helpful trail guide, it also provides a fresh look and an engaging narrative about our most heavily visited national park, through the eyes and ears of a writer who has an extensive history with the park.

Hugh Price @ National Council of Urban League Leadership Luncheon & Guild Awards 75th Anniversary
Jul
28
12:30 pm12:30

Hugh Price @ National Council of Urban League Leadership Luncheon & Guild Awards 75th Anniversary

  • America’s Center Convention Complex, Room TBD St. Louis, MO

Keynote speaker at National Council of Urban League Guild Leadership Luncheon & Guild Awards 75th Anniversary

Price’s memoir recounts his distinguished achievements as an activist, journalist, and educator, and traces key episodes of American history through the lives of his ancestors, including one who fought under Washington and another who was a fugitive slave and drew support from Frederick Douglass. Price himself started his career in New Haven and served as the first executive director of the city’s Black Coalition. In 1978 he joined the editorial board of The New York Times. Ten years later, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, and from 1994 to 2003 he served as president of the National Urban League, before moving on to Brookings and then to the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton.

John Trump @ Goucher College Alumni Weekend
Jul
28
Jul 29

John Trump @ Goucher College Alumni Weekend

  • Goucher College

Panel Discussion

In Still & Barrel, Trump traces the history of manufacturing moonshine whiskey, gin, vodka, and rum in the state all the way to today's boom from the artisan movement. The book also serves as a guide so you can visit the almost 50 distilleries that are now in business.

James Gindlesperger @ Somerset Historical Center
Aug
12
1:00 pm13:00

James Gindlesperger @ Somerset Historical Center

  • Somerset Historical Center

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

Hugh Price @ Cousen Rose Gallery
Aug
12
2:00 pm14:00

Hugh Price @ Cousen Rose Gallery

  • Cousen Rose Gallery

Time TBA

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

James Gindlesperger @ Somerset Historical Center
Aug
13
1:00 pm13:00

James Gindlesperger @ Somerset Historical Center

  • Somerset Historical Center

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

Hugh Price @ Islanders Write Symposium
Aug
14
2:30 pm14:30

Hugh Price @ Islanders Write Symposium

  • Grange Hall

Islanders Write—one-day symposium sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Times. Time TBD.

Price’s memoir recounts his distinguished achievements as an activist, journalist, and educator, and traces key episodes of American history through the lives of his ancestors, including one who fought under Washington and another who was a fugitive slave and drew support from Frederick Douglass. Price himself started his career in New Haven and served as the first executive director of the city’s Black Coalition. In 1978 he joined the editorial board of The New York Times. Ten years later, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, and from 1994 to 2003 he served as president of the National Urban League, before moving on to Brookings and then to the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton.

Ben Anderson @ Jackson County Public Library
Aug
17
6:00 pm18:00

Ben Anderson @ Jackson County Public Library

  • Jackson County Public Library

In Smokies Chronicle, Anderson offers observations on natural and human history, mountain culture, geography, geology, flora and fauna. The book also deftly blends the personal with the universal in a compelling mix of entries from the backcountry.

Although this book can be used as a helpful trail guide, it also provides a fresh look and an engaging narrative about our most heavily visited national park, through the eyes and ears of a writer who has an extensive history with the park.

Hugh Price @ The Bookloft
Aug
26
4:00 pm16:00

Hugh Price @ The Bookloft

  • The Bookloft

Price’s memoir recounts his distinguished achievements as an activist, journalist, and educator, and traces key episodes of American history through the lives of his ancestors, including one who fought under Washington and another who was a fugitive slave and drew support from Frederick Douglass. Price himself started his career in New Haven and served as the first executive director of the city’s Black Coalition. In 1978 he joined the editorial board of The New York Times. Ten years later, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, and from 1994 to 2003 he served as president of the National Urban League, before moving on to Brookings and then to the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton.

Hugh Price @ The National Guard Association of the United States
Sep
8
10:00 am10:00

Hugh Price @ The National Guard Association of the United States

  • National Gurad Association of the United States

Time TBD

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Jeremy Jones @ Carolina Mountains Literary Festival
Sep
8
10:00 am10:00

Jeremy Jones @ Carolina Mountains Literary Festival

  • First Baptist Church

Memoir of Place
First Baptist Church
Jones will share from his book Bearwallow and talk about the process of writing a memoir about a changing place, his family’s home in Fruitland, NC.  He will discuss ways to broaden a memoir into the past, the landscape, and the culture of a place while still telling a personal story.

More Information

Hugh Price @ The University Club
Sep
14
12:00 pm12:00

Hugh Price @ The University Club

  • The University Club

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Hugh Price @ Williams Club
Sep
19
6:00 pm18:00

Hugh Price @ Williams Club

  • Williams Club

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Ben Anderson @ Haywood County Library
Sep
21
2:00 pm14:00

Ben Anderson @ Haywood County Library

  • Haywood County Library

In Smokies Chronicle, Anderson offers observations on natural and human history, mountain culture, geography, geology, flora and fauna. The book also deftly blends the personal with the universal in a compelling mix of entries from the backcountry.

Although this book can be used as a helpful trail guide, it also provides a fresh look and an engaging narrative about our most heavily visited national park, through the eyes and ears of a writer who has an extensive history with the park.

Jeremy Jones @ App State, Hughlene Boston Frank Visiting Writing Series
Sep
21
7:00 pm19:00

Jeremy Jones @ App State, Hughlene Boston Frank Visiting Writing Series

  • App State

Bearwallow: A Personal History of a Mountain Homeland

Across the Blue Ridge Mountains stretches a world both charming and complicated.

Jeremy Jones and his wife move into a small house above the creek where his family had settled 200 years prior. He takes a job alongside his former teachers in the local elementary school and sets out on a search to understand how this ancient land has shaped its people—how it shaped him. His search sends him burrowing in the past—hunting buried treasure and POW camps, unearthing Civil War graves and family feuds, exploring gated communities and tourist traps, encountering changed accents and immigrant populations, tracing Wal-Mart's sidewalks and carved-out mountains—and pondering the future. He meshes narrative and myth, geology and genealogy, fiddle tunes and local color about the briskly changing and oft-stigmatized world of his native southern Appalachians.

Somehow, these journeys continually lead him back to the mystical Bearwallow Mountain, a peak suddenly in flux.

Jeremy Jones @ UNCA Reuter Center (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute)
Sep
22
11:30 am11:30

Jeremy Jones @ UNCA Reuter Center (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute)

  • Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

Bearwallow: A Personal History of a Mountain Homeland

Across the Blue Ridge Mountains stretches a world both charming and complicated.

Jeremy Jones and his wife move into a small house above the creek where his family had settled 200 years prior. He takes a job alongside his former teachers in the local elementary school and sets out on a search to understand how this ancient land has shaped its people—how it shaped him. His search sends him burrowing in the past—hunting buried treasure and POW camps, unearthing Civil War graves and family feuds, exploring gated communities and tourist traps, encountering changed accents and immigrant populations, tracing Wal-Mart's sidewalks and carved-out mountains—and pondering the future. He meshes narrative and myth, geology and genealogy, fiddle tunes and local color about the briskly changing and oft-stigmatized world of his native southern Appalachians.

Somehow, these journeys continually lead him back to the mystical Bearwallow Mountain, a peak suddenly in flux.

Hugh Price @ All Souls Unitarian Church
Oct
1
12:45 pm12:45

Hugh Price @ All Souls Unitarian Church

  • All Sould Unitarian Church

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Hugh Price @ Georgetown University Racial Justice Initiative lecture series
Oct
3
4:00 pm16:00

Hugh Price @ Georgetown University Racial Justice Initiative lecture series

  • Georgetown University

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Hugh Price @ Annual Board Meeting Dinner for Georgetown University
Oct
4
10:00 am10:00

Hugh Price @ Annual Board Meeting Dinner for Georgetown University

  • TBD

Time TBD

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Hugh Price @ Barnes & Noble at Howard University
Oct
6
5:30 pm17:30

Hugh Price @ Barnes & Noble at Howard University

  • Barnes & Noble at Howard University

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

Ben Anderson @ Bag Lunch Program at Trannsylvania County Public Library
Oct
17
12:00 pm12:00

Ben Anderson @ Bag Lunch Program at Trannsylvania County Public Library

  • Trannsylvania County Public Library

In Smokies Chronicle, Anderson offers observations on natural and human history, mountain culture, geography, geology, flora and fauna. The book also deftly blends the personal with the universal in a compelling mix of entries from the backcountry.

Although this book can be used as a helpful trail guide, it also provides a fresh look and an engaging narrative about our most heavily visited national park, through the eyes and ears of a writer who has an extensive history with the park.

Hugh Price @ Bookstore1Sarasota
Nov
15
6:00 pm18:00

Hugh Price @ Bookstore1Sarasota

  • Bookstore1Sarasota

Hugh Price has held an array of positions of leadership during his life. After obtaining a B.A. from Amherst College, he graduated from Yale Law School. He began his career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income clients in New Haven, CT. During the turbulent 1960s, he served as the first executive director of the Black Coalition of New Haven.

In 1978, he began his position as a member of the editorial board of The New York Times, where he wrote editorials on an array of political issues. He served as senior vice-president of WNET/Thirteen in New York, the nation’s largest public television station and in 1984, became director of all national production. In 1988, he was appointed vice-president of the Rockefeller Foundation, where he was instrumental in launching innovative youth initiatives. From 1994 to 2003, he served as president of the National Urban League. He then served as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University.  He lives in New Rochelle, NY.

James Gindlesperger @ Gettysburg Heritage Center
Nov
18
10:00 am10:00

James Gindlesperger @ Gettysburg Heritage Center

  • Gettysburg Heritage Center

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.


James Gindlesperger @ Barnes & Noble in Arlington, VA
Jun
24
2:00 pm14:00

James Gindlesperger @ Barnes & Noble in Arlington, VA

  • Barnes & Noble

Most Americans have heard of Arlington National Cemetery, yet many of those interred rest in obscurity.  This book seeks to honor their memories by telling the stories of 250 people buried here. Many were battlefield heroes, but some survived war to achieve major accomplishments. There are also stories of the original inhabitants of the cemetery, slaves and freedmen who worked on the Lee estate. There are even some humorous stories such as that of the 110-year-old veteran who was asked the secret of his long life. His response was “When you start to die, don’t.” In addition, the book covers the obvious sites that everyone wants to see such as the Tomb of the Unknowns and President Kennedy’s gravesite.

Navigating the cemetery can be frustrating at times. Searching for a particular section of the cemetery is impractical without a map and locating a specific grave within a section can lead to expenditure of significant time and energy.  To aid visitors, a series of maps presents logical starting points. There is a GPS coordinate for each gravesite, which combines with the cemetery’s smart phone application to make location simple. Each of the sites is accompanied by a color photograph.

Hannah Palmer @ Fox Tale Book Shoppe
Jun
24
2:00 pm14:00

Hannah Palmer @ Fox Tale Book Shoppe

  • Fox Tale Book Shoppe

In the months leading up to the birth of her first child, Hannah Palmer discovers that all three of her childhood houses have been wiped out by the expansion of Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Having uprooted herself from a promising career in publishing in her adopted Brooklyn, Palmer embarks on a quest to determine the fate of her lost homes—and of a community that has been erased by unchecked Southern progress.

Palmer's journey takes her from the ruins of kudzu-covered, airport-owned ghost towns to carefully preserved cemeteries wedged between the runways; into awkward confrontations with airport planners, developers, and even her own parents. Along the way, Palmer becomes an amateur detective, an urban historian, and a mother.

Lyrically chronicling the overlooked devastation and beauty along the airport’s fringe communities in the tradition of John Jeremiah Sullivan and Leslie Jamison, Palmer unearths the startling narratives about race, power, and place that continue to shape American cities.

Part memoir, part urban history, Flight Path: A Search for Roots beneath the World's Busiest Airport is a riveting account of one young mother's attempt at making a home where there’s little home left.

Rose Senehi @ Hub City Books
Jun
24
1:00 pm13:00

Rose Senehi @ Hub City Books

  • Hub City Books

Rose Senehi lives in Chimney Rock, N.C., and Carolina Belle is her eighth novel, and the fifth in her Blue Ridge series of "stand alone" books. Among them, Render Unto the Valley was awarded a 2012 IPPY Gold Medal for FictionSoutheast. Dancing on Rocks was awarded the 2014 Indi-Reader Discovery Award for Popular Fiction. In the Shadows of Chimney Rock was nominated for the 2009 SIBA Book Award. The Wind in the Woods, was nominated for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Her other novels include Pelican Watch, Windfall, and Shadows in the Grass.

Ashley Jones @ Hoover Public LIbrary
Jun
24
10:30 am10:30

Ashley Jones @ Hoover Public LIbrary

  • Hoover Public LIbrary

Magic City Gospel is a love song to Birmingham, the Magic City of the South. In traditional forms and free verse poems, 2015 Rona Jaffe Writer’s Award-winner Ashley M. Jones takes readers on a historical, geographical, cultural, and personal journey through her life and the life of her home state. This debut poetry collection is an exploration of race, identity, and history through the eyes of a black woman from Alabama. From De Soto’s “discovery” of Alabama to George Wallace’s infamous stance in the schoolhouse door, to the murders of black men like Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner in modern America, Magic City Gospel weaves its story through time, weaving Jones’ personal history with the troubled, triumphant, and complicated history of Birmingham, and of Alabama at large. In Magic City Gospel’s pages, you’ll find that “gold is laced in Alabama’s teeth,” but you will also see the dark underbelly of a state and a city with a storied past, and a woman whose history is inextricably linked to that past. 

Rose Senehi @ Main Street Books
Jun
22
12:00 pm12:00

Rose Senehi @ Main Street Books

  • Main Street Books

Rose Senehi lives in Chimney Rock, N.C., and Carolina Belle is her eighth novel, and the fifth in her Blue Ridge series of "stand alone" books. Among them, Render Unto the Valley was awarded a 2012 IPPY Gold Medal for FictionSoutheast. Dancing on Rocks was awarded the 2014 Indi-Reader Discovery Award for Popular Fiction. In the Shadows of Chimney Rock was nominated for the 2009 SIBA Book Award. The Wind in the Woods, was nominated for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Her other novels include Pelican Watch, Windfall, and Shadows in the Grass.

Hugh Price at Alvin & Friends Restaurant in New Rochelle, NY
Jun
21
7:00 pm19:00

Hugh Price at Alvin & Friends Restaurant in New Rochelle, NY

  • Alvin & Frieneds Restaurant

On Wednesday, June 21st Alvin & Friends welcomes Hugh B. Price, former President of the National Urban League, for a very special evening. Mr. Price will discuss and sign copies of his new memoir "This African-American Life." From 1994 until 2003, Hugh Price served as president and CEO of the National Urban League. During his tenure he conceived and launched the League's Campaign for African- American Achievement, spearheaded pressure on the federal government to combat police brutality and racial profiling, vigorously defended affirmative action, and helped repair frayed relations between the black and Jewish communities.
In his memoir, Price traces his historical lineage, ancestors such as Nero Hawley who fought in the American Revolution, George and Rebecca Latimer who escaped slavery in Virginia by stowing away on a boat, and Lewis Latimer, the renowned inventor who played a pivotal role in perfecting the original light bulb and who was a member of the Edison Pioneers. Books will be available for sale from The Voracious Reader. No cover charge; cash bar.

Rose Senehi @ Fiction Addiction
Jun
21
6:00 pm18:00

Rose Senehi @ Fiction Addiction

  • Fiction Addiction

Rose Senehi lives in Chimney Rock, N.C., and Carolina Belle is her eighth novel, and the fifth in her Blue Ridge series of "stand alone" books. Among them, Render Unto the Valley was awarded a 2012 IPPY Gold Medal for FictionSoutheast. Dancing on Rocks was awarded the 2014 Indi-Reader Discovery Award for Popular Fiction. In the Shadows of Chimney Rock was nominated for the 2009 SIBA Book Award. The Wind in the Woods, was nominated for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Her other novels include Pelican Watch, Windfall, and Shadows in the Grass.